The Young Evangelist

Devena, attending to her studies.
Devena, attending to her studies.

On a recent trip to Haiti, I got to talk to a very special girl named Devena Pierre at the Divine Shelter School (DSS) in Butte-Boyer. Devena is 11 years old, in 5th grade and wants to be a teacher when she grows up.  As I interviewed her, I heard an amazing story about a girl who has experienced so much in her short life. In 2010, she was at home with her aunt when the earthquake hit. “There was so much shaking—I couldn’t run away,” she explained to me. That tragic day, she lost her great uncle—the leader of her family and the principal of her school.

But Devena never lost hope—or her faith. I saw the light of Jesus in her eyes as she told me her story, about how much her school means to her and recited John 3:16, her favorite Bible verse. When we were almost finished talking, she told the translator she wanted to ask me a question, and then looked at me with great concern and said, “Have you accepted Jesus as your Savior?”

I think I had tears in my eyes as I answered, “Yes; thank you so much for asking! Please keep asking that question!”

And that’s exactly why Cross International supports Divine Shelter Schools—not only are they teaching children the Gospel, but they are teaching them to share the Gospel with everyone they meet! Each student also receives a quality education and nutritious meals to keep them growing healthy and strong. DSS is training the next generation of Christian leaders to reach Haiti for Christ!

-Catherine M.

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